Brian Aspinall

“Leadership is not about showing how successful you are, it is about showing how successful the people you serve are.”

Brian Aspinall is an educator and best selling author and is considered one of the brightest STEM innovators in Canadian education. He is the CEO of Code Breaker Inc., an organization whose mission is to engage students and amplify voices of passionate educators who believe that all students can achieve if given a fair chance. He travels the globe speaking and leading professional development programs that inspire educators to create curious seeking individuals in classrooms built on a community of trust, risk-taking and a freedom to fail. His first book, Code Breaker:15+ Ways to Get Started With Coding, continues to top the charts in STEM Education with a focus on rethinking assessment and evaluation. He was awarded the Prime Minister’s Award for Teaching Excellence for his work with coding and computational thinking. His enthusiasm, thought leadership, and approach to building capacity within STEM education has made him a sought after speaker throughout North America and has earned him the honour of being selected as Canada’s first Minecraft, Micro:BiT, and Makey Makey Ambassadors.

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Hacking the Classroom

Brian is on a mission to expose as many kids as he can to coding and computer science.  In this passionate talk, he makes a case for the importance of exposing youth to the principles of coding and computational thinking to prepare them for a rapidly changing future.

Education Reform

It’s time to rethink best practices. Knowledge is readily available and we must teach and model an inquiry approach to learning. Not just in the classroom, but in industry. We must act as curators – people who collect, organize and share content with one another to continue to further progress. We must teach students to decipher and filter what is important. We must teach adults to do the same.

Beyond Rote Learning

We used to attend school because that is where the knowledge was. Rote learning is still relevant, but it is more important for today’s students to apply knowledge in a deeper way.


The role of the teacher is to create the conditions for invention rather than provide ready-made knowledge.

Seymour Papert